In a bustling street inside Teacher’s Village, Diliman, Quezon City is  Maginhawa. From just another food street to a leader of innovation and creativity, it is becoming known as a hotbed of daring food concepts. Here, we visit five food stops that continuously seek to push the boundaries of Filipino dining.

1
The Lost Bread HQ

The Lost Bread HQ

Opened as a French toast and milkshake shack in one of Maginhawa’s first food hubs, The Lost Bread is looking to a future that’s more than its crazy desserts. A runaway success even on their first week, their eye-catching creations— towering milkshake glasses topped with anything you can possibly think of— have been a staple of many Instagram feeds and counting.

2
Pino

Pino

It was in 2008 when Pino opened in Teacher’s Village. Before, it was just a sleepy university town, with the usual carinderias and a few family-dining places, until Chef Edward Bugia and his partners took the plunge and helped change the way Filipino food is served in the city. “People always say that success comes with a huge dose of luck. I will not lie, we only lucked out in our choice to open a Filipino restaurant with a progressive menu,” shares Chef Ed,“It just made so much sense, PINO— modern Filipino.”

3
Papa Diddi’s

Papa Diddi’s

Papa Diddi’s concept is from a grand family dining tradition serving food to guests. It is named after the late patriarch of the Perez family —hailing from Tuguegarao and eating as heartily as they lived. The tradition continued with their own large brood of eight —who, when introduced to artisanal ice cream, made it the most demanded Sunday dessert, much to their parents’ chagrin. Maginhawa’s food hunters were delighted in having a scoopery that offered such original flavors , like black rice, tarragon, panocha, Davao Meets Bicol (chili and chocolate) and many more—all organic with bursts of flavor.

4
Provenciano

Provenciano

Sometimes, innovation doesn’t always have to be avant-garde. Sometimes, all you need to do is go back to the basics and revisit that which has been previously overlooked. For Provenciano, it’s about finding one’s roots—literally. Chef Chris de Jesus says it is his advocacy to shed light on the country’s regional cuisine. This focus on classic Filipino food with twists in the dining experience  helped catapult Provenciano into one of Maginhawa’s most popular dining destinations.

5
Gerry’s Jeepney

Gerry’s Jeepney

Can you imagine boodle fights in the midst of busy city streets? Luckily, Gerry’s Jeepney makes this a reality.  A Maginhawa icon with an even more iconic concept, this diner is owner Gerry Javier’s labor of love. The country’s chief form of public transportation is clearly the star here—from the colorful jeepneys that greet you upon entrance, to the authentic jeepney dubstep blasting inside its interiors. It is living proof that despite the many developments in the food industry, the classics will always remain  a goldmine.